NEW YORK CITY

Rosalie O’Connor Photography

Rosalie O’Connor danced with American Ballet Theatre for fifteen years until her retirement in 2002. She began to document ABT from within using 35mm film during her last six years as a dancer. 2002 marked her transition on the ABT roster from Dancer to Staff Photographer, and simultaneously she started Rosalie O’Connor Photography, becoming a full-time freelancer.

In addition to most dance periodicals, her images have also appeared in Vogue, Vanity Fair, and The New York Times. Rosalie’s photographs have been displayed in solo exhibitions at Lincoln Center in New York and at The John F. Kennedy Center in Washington, DC. Based in New York City, her assignments take her across the country and occasionally beyond.

Sometimes, people want to know a bit more about the photographer, something more personal. Instead of a straightforward autobiography of words, I wanted to share a string of significant moments for me using photographs, informed by captions. Cecil Beaton named his 1951 memoir, PHOTOBIOGRAPHY. Perhaps you can think of this as my PhotoBiography. The images chosen for Delving Deeper are professional moments that are key to how I’ve had careers in the two fields I’ve loved. Starting from the very beginning.

Delving Deeper

Portfolio

 This permanent gallery in Portfolio shares 85 images, featuring moments from a variety of more than 22 years of varied assignments.

Portfolio

Portraiture

Environmental Portraiture

 Here you can see 60 images that reflect subjects photographed in their natural environment. Sometimes candidly, other times not; many captured at work or outside in nature.

Environmental Portraiture

Studio Portraiture

 In this gallery of portraits, all but six were taken in my NYC apartment. It’s fun to look back and see my very first official portrait, taken on a Sunday morning. She was the newest ABT Company member in 1997; an uber-talented, strong, and fearless seventeen-year-old named, Gillian Murphy.

Studio Portraiture

Just Kids

There are a great many professional dancers that first focused my lens on while they were students. In some instances, they were eight years old when I first met them. It is difficult to articulate, from the perspective of being a visual dance historian, exactly how proud I am of their successes and their careers. BRAVI!

Just Kids

Faces I Miss Onstage

Dance careers are far too short. Many of the dancers that I began documenting in the fall of 1996 have since retired. This gallery is a small selection of faces that I miss seeing in rehearsals, miss onstage, miss seeing excel in multiple roles, and I miss photographing them.

Faces I Miss On Stage

In Memory of

 There are certain people that I have worked with during my own career as a dancer and then continued to document them in my role as a dance photographer before we lost them. Many died too soon, all are missed. I asked fifteen special individuals to share personal memories about my subjects.

In Memory Of

Spotlight Galleries

This is a test credit. In case you want them here

Two Spotlight Galleries will be the first shown, with more to come. The first gallery is focused on my decade-long affiliation photographing the incredible organization, Dancer’s Responding to AIDS.

Another Credit

The second spotlight gallery features a collection of many years of “page bows” at American Ballet Theatre, during their annual spring season at the Metropolitan Opera House, seen in dress rehearsals, performances, galas, and retirements. The subjects and year taken are identified, but you get to guess the roles and productions.

Spotlight Galleries